WTF Fun Fact 13204 – Types of Cheese in the World

Believe it or not, there are over 1,800 types of cheese in the world. Cheese.com actually has a catalog of 1,830 cheeses you can search!

How can there be so many cheeses in the world?

There are so many types of cheese in the world because cheese-making is an ancient craft. Humans have been making cheese for thousands of years in many different cultures and regions. The process of making cheese is relatively simple. It only requires milk, cultures, rennet, and salt. But there are many variations on this basic recipe.

Different types of milk, cultures, rennet, aging, and processing methods result in a wide variety of textures and flavors.

Additionally, different regions have developed their own unique cheeses based on the availability of milk and the local culture and traditions. The use of different herbs, spices, and other ingredients also contributes to the diversity of cheese.

Additionally, the development of new technology and techniques in cheesemaking also allows cheese makers to experiment and create new types of cheese.

What are the different types of cheese?

We can make cheese from the milk of various animals, including cows, goats, sheep, and buffalo, and it comes in a wide variety of textures and flavors.

Some types of cheese, such as cheddar and gouda, can be aged for several years, which gives them a sharper flavor and a harder texture. Other types, such as feta and brie, are typically aged for a shorter period of time and have a softer texture and a milder flavor.

According to Wisconsin Cheese (cited below): “Many different types of cheese are named after or associated with the place they were first made. Parmesan cheese, for example, originates from the area around Parma, Italy. Gouda was first traded in the Dutch town of Gouda. And cheddar cheese originated in the English village of Cheddar in Somerset.”

 WTF fun facts

Source: “Different types of cheese” — Wisconsin Cheese

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WTF Fun Fact 12618 – Pauline, The Presidential Cow

Until the late 19th century, presidents brought their own cows to the White House to provide milk. There was no dairy delivery in Washington DC at the time.

When President William Howard Taft’s cow Mooly Wooly died in 1909, it was replaced by Pauline Wayne, a 1500-pound Holstein-Friesian. She was a gift to the Taft family from the farm of Senator Isaac Stephenson of Wisconsin.

The 4-year-old black and white bovine was the last presidential cow, but by far the most famous. The media appears to have been obsessed with her. Her arrival was covered by The New York Times, and her exploits appeared in publications from The Evening Independent in St. Petersburg, Florida, to The Milwaukee Sentinel.

One particular bit of drama was covered far and wide. Pauline was visiting the International Dairymen’s Exposition in Milwaukee in 1911 (with her milk sold in souvenir bottles for 50 cents each). But on the trip home, she went missing.

We always figured it would be hard to lose a cow, especially the President’s cow. But it happened.

It turned out Pauline’s private car was accidentally hooked up to a train carrying cows to slaughter at the Chicago stockyards. Can you imagine the scandal?!

Luckily, after a series of frantic telegraphs from the dairy show, train attendants ended up locating Pauline’s car as newspapers reported how she “narrowly escaped death.” – WTF fun facts

Source: “Pauline Wayne, President Taft’s Famous Cow” — Presidential Pet Museum

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WTF Fun Fact – Fingos

WTF Fun Fact - Fingos

General Mills worked for over 3 years and spent $34 million in advertising on Fingos – a cereal that was meant to be eaten with fingers as a snack and without milk. The product was a failure and discontinued a year later. – WTF Fun Facts

Source: Fingos – Wikipedia

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